Your Own Land

Knights who own their own land also spend time on it, acting as both landlord and farmer. By spending most his time on his lands during a given year of game time, based on the result of this solo, a vassal knight might get several benefi ts, such as extra money; as well, he gets experience checks to his Folk Lore, Intrigue, and Stewardship skills, and a check for either the Just or the Arbitrary trait (player’s option).

INCOME
Determine the kind of year your holding had, in general terms.

d6 Result Type of Year
1 Terrible (blight, drought, etc.). See Step 3 in “Common Events.”
2 Bad. See Step 3 in “Common Events.”
3–4 Normal.
5 Good. Gain an additional 1d20 shillings of income for the year.
6 Excellent. See Step 3 in “Common Events.”

COMMON EVENTS
Step 1. Your lord visits. You gain a check in Intrigue.

Step 2. You deal regularly with the local commoners. You gain a check in Folk Lore.

Step 3. You review your estate. You gain a check in Stewardship.

If your holding has had a Terrible or a Bad year (see “Income” above), make a Stewardship roll; if you are married or have a steward, you may use your wife’s or steward’s value instead if it is higher than your own. If this roll is successful, you manage to maintain you holding’s health and status. If it failed, you spend the next year as a Poor knight unless you have at least £2 of other income. If your holding has had a Excellent year, make a Stewardship roll; you may use your wife’s or steward’s value if it is higher than your own. If this roll is successful, you may maintain yourself as a Rich knight next year; if it failed, you or your officers squander the excess, and you gain only normal revenue for the year.

Step 4. You sit in judgment. Roll 2d6 twice to find contestants in the argument. The first result determines the plaintiff, and the second is the defendant.

2d6 Result Contestant
2 A rich farmer, who offers you £2 to settle for him
3 A rich farmer, who offers you £1 to settle for him
4 The local priest
5 A poor old widow
6 A peddler
7–8 A farmer
9 A tradesman
10 A poor farmer
11 An attractive and flirtatious widow
12 A childhood friend, who offers you £1 “to help you think”

Next, roll 1d20 to find out what the contestants are in dispute over.

d20 Result Dispute
1 Ownership of a cow
2 Ownership of a pig
3 Ownership of an ox
4 Use of the village’s plow
5 An unpaid debt
6–8 An exchange of verbal insults
9–12 A brawl
13 A knifing
14–15 Petty theft
16 Theft of a valuable property
17 Something about a wife…
18–19 Something about a daughter…
20 A killing

Once these things have been determined, you can either (i) Choose a party and decide in his or her favor, collecting any promised reward and automatically getting an Arbitrary check; or (ii) Attempt a Just roll and thus try to decide fairly, getting a Just check.

Glory: Ordinary manorial activities earn no Glory, although the mere act of holding land always gets 1 point of Glory per librum of income, gained during the Winter Phase. (A typical vassal knight’s manor earns £6 to £8 per year.)

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